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Typeminer
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Typeminer »

The trouble with losing weight while sitting on your ass is that most of the weight you lose is muscle. Guess how I know that. :mrgreen:

And I have never in my life been even a little bit overweight, except the year my teen metabolism started to slow down and I hit peak lifetime weight at 19. (Then I got thrown out of college, money got tight, and I lost 50 pounds in a year . . . )
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Alkarii
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii »

I ordered a MOLLE vest earlier, and it comes with eight pouches with the Flecktarn pattern. In the picture, two that look very similar to the compass pouch the US military uses are attached to the vest, at the shoulders, and there are six large pouches that sit lower. I know I'm going to put at least some fire making supplies in the larger pouches, or maybe get a pouch to put on the waistband of my ruck and use that to hold tinder and some method of starting a fire (I intend to keep more than one method in my gear), and probably some flares and a signaling mirror, and likely a pocket chainsaw or something.

Anyone got any other suggestions for what kinds of stuff I need to put in there to carry on my person should the need arise?
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Catawampus
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Catawampus »

Alkarii wrote: Thu Apr 08, 2021 12:35 am I ordered a MOLLE vest earlier, and it comes with eight pouches with the Flecktarn pattern. In the picture, two that look very similar to the compass pouch the US military uses are attached to the vest, at the shoulders, and there are six large pouches that sit lower. I know I'm going to put at least some fire making supplies in the larger pouches, or maybe get a pouch to put on the waistband of my ruck and use that to hold tinder and some method of starting a fire (I intend to keep more than one method in my gear), and probably some flares and a signaling mirror, and likely a pocket chainsaw or something.

Anyone got any other suggestions for what kinds of stuff I need to put in there to carry on my person should the need arise?
Generally, the vest is where you'd carry the more essential items that you don't want to be without even after you've stripped off your main packs. What such items might be depends on your environment, what you're trying to accomplish, and your own personal whims. Small basic tools, common first aid stuff, mobile phone, walrus repellent, sunglasses. . .whatever you want to be sure is close at hand at all times. You just want to try to keep it light weight, and leave the heavy stuff for the packs and satchels.
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TazManiac
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Re: More Stuff

Post by TazManiac »

Both Small & Medium folding knives [a decent one and a tiny one], Birthday Candles in a ziplock bag, energy/granola bar or two, 'disposable' rain poncho (the thin-mil ones fold up real tiny...), Magnifying Glass, Leatherman type folding tool?

edit- Now that I've hit 'submit', how about a yard/meter or two if that braided Tac-Cord stuff..

Oh, and a Loud Assed Whistle on a lanyard.
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lake_wrangler
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Re: More Stuff

Post by lake_wrangler »

Catawampus wrote: Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:01 pm walrus repellent
Don't leave home without it... :mrgreen:
Alkarii
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii »

TazManiac wrote: Thu Apr 08, 2021 4:07 pm Both Small & Medium folding knives [a decent one and a tiny one], Birthday Candles in a ziplock bag, energy/granola bar or two, 'disposable' rain poncho (the thin-mil ones fold up real tiny...), Magnifying Glass, Leatherman type folding tool?

edit- Now that I've hit 'submit', how about a yard/meter or two if that braided Tac-Cord stuff..

Oh, and a Loud Assed Whistle on a lanyard.
I was actually thinking of getting my rain suit (Flecktarn patterned, as well...) and putting it in one of the side pockets on the rucksack, but at the same time, a military poncho would be much faster to put on, and I don't need to worry about putting it over the ruck, which already has a waterproof layer, and the roll down closure makes it difficult (but I assume not impossible) for rain to get in it.

As for knives, I need to take the Hoffman Richter tactical folding knife my dad got for me as a Christmas gift up to Home Depot and see if I can find out what size screw I need, because my brother and I found that the screws fell out of both of our knives, though the nuts stayed in place. However, two is one, and one is none, so I plan to get more.

EDIT: Prematurely hit submit... When you say Tac-cord, are you talking about paracord? I was thinking about getting a lot of 550 paracord (breaking weight is 550 pounds, hence the name), but a small amount of cordage that is in easy access isn't a bad idea.

Which reminds me, I saw a video once that was showing off a spool of paracord that looked like a tape measure, and it had a blade on it to cut it as needed, so that could be a decent addition.
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Typeminer
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Typeminer »

Never used it in an emergency myself, but read a long time ago that a 1000 foot spool of dental floss can be really useful. Pretty good tensile strength for its weight, though easily abraded.

No need to pack it in the Montana bush country, of course. :mrgreen:
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Alkarii
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii »

I was looking online for something to use as a shelter that could be put in my rucksack (or attached to it), but the tents of the appropriate camo pattern for my area were sold out, not to mention having to deal with the poles, which would add a lot of weight. However, I managed to find a nice, multifunctional tarp that seems like it will work if I use some cordage and ingenuity, and I can make tent poles from scavenged materials if I don't want to tie a rope between a coupe of trees.

I also managed to find a decent sized rain poncho, along with a sleeping bag. The bag itself has a season rating of 2 (so cooler nights in summer and spring), but it can also be good enough at temps as low as 5⁰ to 10⁰ C. I'm not sure what that is in Fahrenheit, though I'm sure Arkansas doesn't get that cold very often, except during the worst part of winter. However, if I combine that with one or both of my poncho liners, I might be okay. Keep in mind, I wouldn't sleep in an exposed position without any shelter if I had any option.
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Dave
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Dave »

Alkarii wrote: Sat Apr 10, 2021 10:35 pm The bag itself has a season rating of 2 (so cooler nights in summer and spring), but it can also be good enough at temps as low as 5⁰ to 10⁰ C. I'm not sure what that is in Fahrenheit, though I'm sure Arkansas doesn't get that cold very often, except during the worst part of winter. However, if I combine that with one or both of my poncho liners, I might be okay. Keep in mind, I wouldn't sleep in an exposed position without any shelter if I had any option.
That would be in 40-45F range. Possibly not warm enough for frost or snow weather, without additional insulation.

You might want to consider carrying along a Thermarest or similar pad... that, plus a lean-to cover of branches, might be enough to the bag's usable range enough.
Alkarii
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii »

Yeah, as I said, if I add a poncho liner, which is something really good at trapping heat (probably a little more than the sleeping bag, if used correctly), I should be fine for an Arkansas winter, if I have some kind of shelter. I'm also going to try to find a bivi bag to use outside of the sleeping bag, to keep water out. Hopefully I can find one that's Gore-Tex. One trick my dad told me about was when he used a space blanket with his poncho liner, and he was sleeping in shorts and a t-shirt while the other guys were freezing.

Seriously, if you haven't used a poncho liner before, I recommend either visiting your local military surplus store, or looking online. Zerofoxtrot.com will sell some in certain patterns that they only run for a little while, but you can also check out military1st.com for some if the same patterns that might get restocked at some point. Mil-Tec makes them. You might even be able to find a zippered poncho liner in OCP (Operational Camouflage Pattern) that the US military uses now. I've been using mine as a sleeping bag on my bed with the ceiling fan going all night during winter, and I still got a bit too close to sweating.
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Catawampus
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Catawampus »

Alkarii wrote: Thu Apr 08, 2021 9:30 pm Which reminds me, I saw a video once that was showing off a spool of paracord that looked like a tape measure, and it had a blade on it to cut it as needed, so that could be a decent addition.
Then you have the extra weight of the dispenser to carry around, which might not be much by itself but every little bit of extra weight adds up. And it will always take up the maximum amount of space in your pack, even if it only has three feet of cord left in it.

Personally, I've found that the best way to transport cord such as that is to just coil it up and then stuff it into a sock. That keeps it contained and easy to get to, it's soft and flexible so you can cram it in to wherever you have space in your pack or pockets, and you have a spare sock when you need it as well.
Alkarii wrote: Sat Apr 10, 2021 10:35 pmHowever, I managed to find a nice, multifunctional tarp that seems like it will work if I use some cordage and ingenuity, and I can make tent poles from scavenged materials if I don't want to tie a rope between a coupe of trees.
A basic tent is just a tarp, with means to hold it up off of you and keep it from blowing away on the wind. You don't even need tent poles, if you can put your packs under it so that they'll hold it up off of you when you crawl under to sleep. Then all you need is a means to hold the tarp down.
Dave wrote: Sun Apr 11, 2021 12:11 am You might want to consider carrying along a Thermarest or similar pad... that, plus a lean-to cover of branches, might be enough to the bag's usable range enough.
Yeah, putting something under the sleeping bag to keep it off the ground will greatly improve its ability to keep you warm. There are plenty of light-weight pads made just for that sort of thing, some made of foam and some inflatable. Those are useful for if you don't know whether you'll be able to throw something together for the purpose out of grass or branches or bear carcasses or whatever (or if you just don't feel like putting in the effort to make something on-site).
Alkarii
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii »

I actually have that covered: I acquired a surplus military issue self inflating bedroll for, like... $16? You unscrew the valve at one of the corners, and the foam inside expands, letting air into it. Then you close the valve again, and you're good to go! (Make sure to open the valve when you roll it up so you can squeeze the air out, then close it again when you're done.) However, I also know how to make what's called a brush mat, and if I happen to use pine branches for that, I think I might try putting some leaves on top to keep the sap off of everything.

I do like the idea of using a sock to hold the cordage, though. There's actually several different uses for socks in survival gear, my favorite being to put an unlubricated condom inside (unrolled) so you can fill it with extra water.

However, I also grabbed some small, lightweight cable cuffs (two of the largest, for holding my heavy rope, and two that were pretty small, so I could clip them around smaller types of cordage, like the paracord.

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention, once I get enough of the right gear for a proper AWOL bag, my brother and I were thinking about getting some recording equipment and making videos teaching folks how to use all that stuff, along with some other neat things, like rappelling, or how to make some kind of system that doesn't use electricity but can still help you get water that can be made potable. We were thinking of making a series that is kind of like Patrolling with Sean Kennedy, but maybe go more into how to use tactical gear, land navigation... pretty much basic soldier stuff, except for combat.
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Atomic
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Atomic »

However you decide to camp, be sure you have a water resistant ground cloth under you. More than once I've been on the beach (for example) and suddenly found my rump was cold from the seawater migrating up through the sand and into the towel. Similar situation in the woods/field/where ever. It's not necessarily quick, but it can happen, and then you're stuck with a soggy/clammy bedroll or such.
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Typeminer
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Typeminer »

I am confident that Alkarii is using a ground cloth. 8-)

Very much enjoying this thread. Way too long since I've done any camping.

One thing I've found useful is to just have a couple of the thin bags used for vegetables (not the perforated ones, obviously) in any pack I take on a hike. Have used them to douse streamside fires, prevent wet butt sitting on damp ground, and gather wild watercress.
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Alkarii
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii »

Actually, depending on how I set up my tarp shelter, I could use part of it as a ground cloth. Also, one of the things I was planning to put in the videos I mentioned was to show how to spot signs that a potential campsite might be subject to flooding, and also how to make a proper trench around the site to divert the water.

I was also going to look for a bivy bag, which is a waterproof bag into which you put your sleeping system. In basic, one of the drill sergeants told us to also try to get our bedroll inside it, so we don't end up moving off of it while sleeping. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find one in Flecktarn...

Oh, wait, hold on a minute... I just found a 3-layer bivy in Flecktarn that is actually in stock! Cha-ching!

Not sure if I mentioned it before, but the reason I like the Flecktarn pattern so much largely has to do with the fact that it's the most effective pattern where I live.

EDIT: I've been using military1st.com to locate stuff I can't find in any of the stores around here. I found a 4 Season sleeping bag in Flecktarn (it can apparently go to -10⁰ C, and that might be a bit colder than it gets in Arkansas) that I added to my wish list, and I can technically afford it at the moment, but I want to at least get the stuff I've already ordered and then properly organize my ruck.
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Atomic
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Atomic »

When you mentioned Flecktarn cammo, I flashed on the WWI German hexagonal aircraft cammo. You don't need subdued colors to be effective when breaking up outlines!

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Challenger007
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Challenger007 »

Alkarii wrote: Mon Apr 05, 2021 6:31 am Yeah, but the issue is that I don't actually eat much during the week, because I don't have time to stop while on my delivery route. At the same time, I'm also sitting for most of the time I'm on the clock, which makes it kinda surprising that I actually lost some weight.
And what about the ratio of proteins, fats and carbohydrates? Carbohydrates must necessarily be in the diet, but not prevail over everything else. Do you eat cereals? How many vegetables and fruits are in your diet? And another very important question is the level of stress. Many people, when under stress, overeat without noticing it. Besides, there is such a thing as psychosomatics. Your body under stress may strive to accumulate as much fat as possible "for a rainy day." It is very important to be in peace of mind.
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AnotherFairportfan
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Post by AnotherFairportfan »

Atomic wrote: Tue Apr 13, 2021 11:50 pm When you mentioned Flecktarn cammo, I flashed on the WWI German hexagonal aircraft cammo. You don't need subdued colors to be effective when breaking up outlines!

Image
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Warrl
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Post by Warrl »

Carbohydrates must necessarily be in the diet
Primarily because, short of being an exclusive carnivore (even cats aren't quite), they are almost impossible to avoid. You can't even season your meat without getting carbohydrates. (Salt is OK.)

The US's FDA states a minimum needed amount of carbohydrates, but admits that getting less than the minimum - all the way to zero - causes no symptoms as long as the person is getting enough of everything else including calories.
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Catawampus
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Catawampus »

Atomic wrote: Tue Apr 13, 2021 11:50 pm When you mentioned Flecktarn cammo, I flashed on the WWI German hexagonal aircraft cammo. You don't need subdued colors to be effective when breaking up outlines!
If you've got a bright, vivid environment, then you use bright, vivid camouflage. I've seen vehicles painted bright pink, because they were used in bright pink deserts.
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