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AnotherFairportfan
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Re: More Stuff

Post by AnotherFairportfan » Sun Oct 27, 2019 9:08 pm

Yeah - that's a "boxer" engine; a flat opposed four {or, in the case of Porsche, six} - allee same-same the original VW bug.
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Bookworm
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Bookworm » Mon Oct 28, 2019 11:27 pm

lake_wrangler wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:44 pm
AnotherFairportfan wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:30 pm
Also, the boxer engine layout that i believe Subarus use would make the engine shorter, allowing more legroom.
That, I knew... The engine in there was so small... a 1.8 L. engine, but only as deep as two cylinders. Think of a V4 engine (no, not a typo, V4, not V8) that was flattened, so that the cylinders were at opposing ends of each other, instead of at an angle to form a V... This meant that a 4 cylinder engine only needed to be half as long as a regular inline 4 cylinder engine. So yes, that translated itself into more leg room.
Wouldn't that be a flat 4?

I wouldn't want to be the guy having to service that son-of-a-gun. Although, if it's designed right, it'd be like the VW Bug flat-four engine. Get under the car, you could pop the bails off of the valve covers, and adjust the valves without even having to jack it up.
I'll get a life when it's proven and substantiated to be better than what I'm currently experiencing.

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AnotherFairportfan
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Re: More Stuff

Post by AnotherFairportfan » Tue Oct 29, 2019 12:11 am

Yep - what they call a "Boxer" design.

So far as i know all Subarus have them.
Proof Positive the world is not flat: If it were, cats would have pushed everything off the edge by now.

Alkarii
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii » Wed Oct 30, 2019 5:14 am

Well, that old cat my dad picked up a few years ago that won't use the litter box? He decided that he's taking the cat to the animal shelter Saturday (that, or he's gonna tell me to go). She isn't a bad cat; she just needs to be the only cat in the home and needs a little bit of care that nobody really has the time to give.
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Bookworm
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Bookworm » Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:21 pm

Alkarii wrote:
Wed Oct 30, 2019 5:14 am
Well, that old cat my dad picked up a few years ago that won't use the litter box? He decided that he's taking the cat to the animal shelter Saturday (that, or he's gonna tell me to go). She isn't a bad cat; she just needs to be the only cat in the home and needs a little bit of care that nobody really has the time to give.
We had to do that with an attempted rescue. Nice friendly cat - as long as there wasn't another cat around.
I'll get a life when it's proven and substantiated to be better than what I'm currently experiencing.

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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii » Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:43 am

It turns out that he never took the cat, or told me to do it, so maybe we're stuck with her.
There is no such thing as a science experiment gone wrong.

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Re: More Stuff

Post by AnotherFairportfan » Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:47 am

Alkarii wrote:
Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:43 am
It turns out that he never took the cat, or told me to do it, so maybe we're stuck with her.
"The cat came back..."
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Alkarii » Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:19 pm

I'm gonna get into hunting small game this winter, focusing on rabbits and squirrels. Anyone got any good recipes for either one?
There is no such thing as a science experiment gone wrong.

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Dave
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Dave » Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:44 pm

Alkarii wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:19 pm
I'm gonna get into hunting small game this winter, focusing on rabbits and squirrels. Anyone got any good recipes for either one?
We should prevail upon Paul, to publish Katherine's recipe for squirrel stew.

Short of that sort of revelation, I'd think that some variant of a Hungarian goulash (gulyás) would probably work with either... stew them up with potatoes, sweet peppers, tomatoes, onions, maybe a bit of garlic, and whatever other veggies come to mind. Bigos (a Polish hunter's stew) might also be good, especially if you are fond of sour (it includes cabbage and sauerkraut).

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Re: More Stuff

Post by Warrl » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:41 pm

Short of that sort of revelation, I'd think that some variant of a Hungarian goulash (gulyás) would probably work with either... stew them up with potatoes, sweet peppers, tomatoes, onions, maybe a bit of garlic, and whatever other veggies come to mind. Bigos (a Polish hunter's stew) might also be good, especially if you are fond of sour (it includes cabbage and sauerkraut).
American goulash recipes might include paprika, measured in teaspoons. It's a spice.

Hungarian goulash recipes will include paprika, measured in cups (or a roughly-equivalent metric measurement). It's a vegetable.

Having made it both ways, I prefer the Hungarian approach. But it can be hard to find affordable paprika in that quantity in the US - try stores that cater to restaurants!

(Paprika literally is a vegetable, in the same family as habaneros and bell peppers - i.e. the capsicum pepper family. One of the milder members, but not as mild as bell peppers which have actually forgotten how to make capsaicin.)

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Re: More Stuff

Post by TazManiac » Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:48 pm

It's been my experience, reading up on this stuff in old time'y 'How to live in the Wilderness' books,; you'll want to dress them down right away, esp getting the glands away from the meat- causes a flavour difference otherwise.

Said to be esp true of things like Cougar/Mountain Lion.

"Don't Eat Rare Bear".

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Re: More Stuff

Post by lake_wrangler » Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:31 pm

TazManiac wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:48 pm
"Don't Eat Rare Bear".
Not to be confused with "Don't eat Care Bears..." :mrgreen:

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Dave
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Dave » Wed Nov 13, 2019 10:35 pm

lake_wrangler wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:31 pm
TazManiac wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:48 pm
"Don't Eat Rare Bear".
Not to be confused with "Don't eat Care Bears..." :mrgreen:
"Don't dare eat rare Care Bear there, or elsewhere..."?

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AnotherFairportfan
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Re: More Stuff

Post by AnotherFairportfan » Wed Nov 13, 2019 11:37 pm

Dave wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 10:35 pm
lake_wrangler wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:31 pm
TazManiac wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:48 pm
"Don't Eat Rare Bear".
Not to be confused with "Don't eat Care Bears..." :mrgreen:
"Don't dare eat rare Care Bear there, or elsewhere..."?
Barbie eat a sandwich.
Proof Positive the world is not flat: If it were, cats would have pushed everything off the edge by now.

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Catawampus
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Catawampus » Thu Nov 14, 2019 4:11 pm

Alkarii wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:19 pm
I'm gonna get into hunting small game this winter, focusing on rabbits and squirrels. Anyone got any good recipes for either one?
Trapping them will usually give you more meat than shooting at them will (and will give you more useful pelts if that matters), but if you do that you want to remove them from the traps as soon as possible. Otherwise you'll just get well-fed hawks and coyotes and whatever. Watch out for fleas abandoning their bodies and looking for a new host, and be sure to cook the meat well to avoid the worms and stuff that small critter often have in abundance. Also remember that rodents tend to have scent glands, which you might want to remove.

Also, watch out for poisoned ones. People often leave out poison for varmints, and you can get yourself poisoned secondhand by eating a squirrel that itself ate some poison. It probably won't be enough to really hurt you, but it could be unpleasant.

Squirrels, rats, and the like made up a good part of my diet when I was a kid, but I usually didn't go in much for anything fancy with them. If I ate them cooked, it was often just put them on a spit and cook them over a fire until the fur was charred off and the meat done. They're easy enough to thoroughly skin and clean up, too, which I'm assuming you have some idea of how to do, and if you do that then you can always throw them in a stew. Stew is a good way to use the little tiny chunks of meat that you get from those types of critters, and can mellow out the flavour if you think that they taste a bit too strong normally.
Warrl wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:41 pm
American goulash recipes might include paprika, measured in teaspoons. It's a spice.

Hungarian goulash recipes will include paprika, measured in cups (or a roughly-equivalent metric measurement). It's a vegetable.
Americans also have a weird compulsion to throw macaroni noodles and ground beef into goulash. Really, what Americans usually serve as goulash (which can still be good tasting) is nothing like what you'll get in Hungary. It's like comparing the stereotypical New England family's "Mexican" and "Chinese" recipes to the real thing.

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Re: More Stuff

Post by Warrl » Thu Nov 14, 2019 5:00 pm

Americans also have a weird compulsion to throw macaroni noodles and ground beef into goulash.
I agree about the weird compulsion to throw pasta into everything*. However, the goulash recipes I've found all call for beef cut into small pieces, and ground beef certainly is in small pieces...

* My lady and I grew up with very different approaches to deciding what's for dinner. Her family's, and hers: pick a starch, and find something to add to it. My family's: pick a protein, and find something to add to it. Mine: pick a protein, and do I feel like it needs anything added to it?

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Dave
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Dave » Thu Nov 14, 2019 6:07 pm

Warrl wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:41 pm
Having made it both ways, I prefer the Hungarian approach. But it can be hard to find affordable paprika in that quantity in the US - try stores that cater to restaurants!
Yeah. You can pay $4-$5 for a single small bottle of an ounce or two of the stuff at a supermarket, or you can pay about $2.50/lb from a mail-order restaurant supply company.

I might have to try to grab a pound or two at Smart & Final the next time I'm there... would be good for soups and stews.

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AnotherFairportfan
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Re: More Stuff

Post by AnotherFairportfan » Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:12 pm

Warrl wrote:
Thu Nov 14, 2019 5:00 pm
My lady and I grew up with very different approaches to deciding what's for dinner. Her family's, and hers: pick a starch, and find something to add to it. My family's: pick a protein, and find something to add to it. Mine: pick a protein, and do I feel like it needs anything added to it?
"Vegetables are what food eats."
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Re: More Stuff

Post by Warrl » Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:48 pm

Dave wrote:
Thu Nov 14, 2019 6:07 pm
Warrl wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:41 pm
Having made it both ways, I prefer the Hungarian approach. But it can be hard to find affordable paprika in that quantity in the US - try stores that cater to restaurants!
Yeah. You can pay $4-$5 for a single small bottle of an ounce or two of the stuff at a supermarket, or you can pay about $2.50/lb from a mail-order restaurant supply company.
At most standard (not restaurant-specialty) grocery stores, most of the little jars of herbs and spices are in a pretty narrow price range. Narrow enough that I suspect that the largest share of the price is for the little jar and the handling of that little jar - not the contents.

I once lucked out and found half-pound containers of three or four spices, including paprika, in a dollar store. For most spices, though, there's a flip side: how long will it take you to use a half pound of dried basil? As it happened, I knew about Hungarian goulash recipes and immediately knew what I would do with most of a container of paprika... basil, not so much.

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Re: More Stuff

Post by Bookworm » Sat Nov 16, 2019 7:36 pm

Personally, I can't stand paprika on most stuff. Deviled eggs is about it.

I don't even like "Dry Roasted Peanuts" from most brands because apparently, "Dry Roasted Peanuts" should contain <insert long list of spices here>, peanuts, and salt.
What? I thought I was buying _dry roasted_ nuts, not spiced nuts.

Squirrel - I could ask my mother, she's from rural West Virginia (in the 40's and 50's). Stew is generally how you use it. Sometimes a stir fry.

.22, if you're good enough for head shots, is great for that sort of thing. Leaves the pelt and most meat intact. Mind you, if you're going to do that, just use a pellet gun. They're not exactly known for being tough (not like possum, which requires a 30-30 to get a heart shot)

Another thing to keep in mind. Are you going to do something with the pelts? If so, you'll really want to do head shots. Descent them (if they're big enough), skin them, gut them, and stuff the pelts in the freezer for a day. It'll kill the pests. Then you can tan and clean them. You can also just stretch them and do a pre-tanning chemical after scraping - and leave outside. The pests will leave the fur, because they need a regular blood meal. They won't get that from a dead skin. For small hides, embroidery hoops can work as stretching frames.

Don't eat crow. According to my mother, it's greasy and disgusting to eat. There's a reason that "Eating Crow" is considered a horrible thing. (My uncle shot one, and my grandfather forced him to dress it and eat it, while my mother and aunt watched. He was VERY much a 'you shoot it, you eat it'. I suspect that if they hadn't become good shots quickly, they'd have had a lot of bark stew.)

Spices - if you want larger quantities, hit up a restaurant supply house.
I'll get a life when it's proven and substantiated to be better than what I'm currently experiencing.

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